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Firearm-Related Fatalities in US Children & Youth: Homicide, Suicide, and Unintentional

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Nov. 2013

This infographic covers three types of firearm-related injuries and how they affect children and youth: homicide, suicide, and unintentional. This is the first in a three-part series of infographics about firearms.

The other infographics in the series are available here: 

Print version of Firearm-Related Fatalities in US Children & Youth: Homicide, Suicide, and Unintentional infographic with sources

This infographic covers three types of firearm-related injuries and how they affect children and youth--homicide, suicide, and unintentional.

FIREARM-RELATED FATALITIES IN US CHILDREN & YOUTH: HOMICIDE, SUICIDE, AND UNINTENTIONAL

Homicide is the second leading cause of death among youth*

From 2005-2010:

  • Motor vehicle: 56,611
  • Homicide: 31,549
  • Suicide: 25,810 (WISQARS, 2010)

From 2005-2010, 83% of all youth* homicides involved a firearm (WISQARS, 2010)

Youth* make up 29% of all homicides and 35% of all firearm-related homicides, but only 14% of the population (WISQARS, 2010)

Firearms are used in nearly half (46%) of all suicides by youth* (WISQARS, 2010)

More than 1 in 3 suicides of those under age 18 occurred the same day as a crisis (such as an argument with a parent or a break-up) (Suicide Prevention Resource Center & Harvard Injury Control Research Center, 2002)

When someone under the age of 19 uses a firearm to complete suicide, it usually belongs to a family member. In 2 out of 3 of these cases, the firearm was kept unlocked (Suicide Prevention Resource Center & Harvard Injury Control Research Center, 2002)

On average, 177 youth* and 64 children** die of unintentional shootings every year (WISQARS, 2000-2010)

Preventing unintentional fatal shootings of children and youth in the US could have saved over $439 million in 2005 alone (WISQARS, 2005)

Unintentional shootings make up 16% of firearm-related deaths in children** compared to 2% for the general public (WISQARS, 2010)

*Youth are defined as ages 15-24
**Children are defined as ages 0-14

For evidence-informed strategies for prevention, visit our resource guide: http://ChildrensSafetyNetwork.org/firearm-resource-guide-2013

The other infographics in the series are available here: 

Sources

Suicide Prevention Resource Center, & Harvard Injury Control Research Center. (2002). Linking Data to Save Lives. NVISS Fact Sheet. Retrieved April 16, 2013, from http://www.sprc.org/sites/sprc.org/files/library/YouthSuicideFactSheet.pdf

WISQARS. (2000-2010). Fatal Injury Data. WISQARS (p. Accessed October 31st, 2013 by R. Hunt). Atlanta, GA. Retrieved from http://webappa.cdc.gov/sasweb/ncipc/mortrate10_us.html

WISQARS. (2005). Cost of Injury Reports. WISQARS (p. Accessed October 3rd, 2013 by R. Hunt). Atlanta, GA. Retrieved from http://wisqars.cdc.gov:8080/costT/

WISQARS. (2005-2010). Fatal Injury Data. WISQARS (p. Accessed April 15th, 2013 by R. Hunt). Atlanta, GA. Retrieved from http://webappa.cdc.gov/sasweb/ncipc/mortrate10_us.html