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Walking Safe: Child Pedestrian Safety

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Nov. 2013

Every year, an average of 67,124 child pedestrians are injured. 704 of those child pedestrians die. As it grows darker earlier, child pedestrians become harder to see. 36% of the deaths of children under 16 occurred between 3:00 and 7:00 PM. This infographic from Children's Safety Network covers deaths, risk factors, and more about child pedestrians.

Print Version of Walking Safe: Child Pedestrian Safety Infographic

As it grows darker earlier, child pedestrians become harder to see. 36% of deaths of children under 16 occurred between 3 and 7 PM, so drive safe!

WALKING SAFE: Child Pedestrian Safety

Every year:* 67,124 child** pedestrians are fatally or nonfatally injured(WISQARS, 2005-2010)

Children ages 15-19 suffer the most pedestrian injures (WISQARS, 2005-2010)

Age Group

Average Fatal and Nonfatal Injuries per Year

0-4 yrs

6,456

5-9 yrs

12,575

10-14 yrs

19,462

15-19 yrs

28,631

20-24 yrs

25,331

25-29 yrs

20,683

30-34 yrs

15,638

35-39 yrs

15,004

40-44 yrs

16,561

45-49 yrs

16,083

50-54 yrs

14,379

55-59 yrs

10,597

60-64 yrs

7,774

65-69 yrs

5,304

70-74 yrs

4,248

75-79 yrs

4,247

80-84 yrs

3,067

85+ yrs

2,311

704 of these child pedestrians die (WISQARS, 2005-2010)

RISK FACTORS INCLUDE:

AGE (WISQARS, 2005-2010)

Age

Average Deaths

Percent

0-4

155

22%

5-9

111

16%

10-14

134

19%

15-19

305

43%

 

GENDER Boys account for 66% or 2/3 child pedestrian deaths (WISQARS, 2005-2010)

LOCATION Living in a dense, low-income, urban residential area (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2009)

RACE American Indian/Alaskan Native & Black children die at 1.6 times the rate of White children and 2.4 times the rate of Asian/Pacific Islander children (WISQARS, 2005-2010)

DID YOU KNOW?

36% of deaths of children <16 occurred between 3pm and 7pm (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2009)

Texting pedestrians are nearly 4x more likely than undistracted pedestrians to display unsafe crossing behaviors (Thompson, Rivara, Ayyagari, & Ebel, 2012)

ABOUT

*Numbers are pulled from WISQARS Fatal and Nonfatal data for 2005-2010 and then averaged

**For the purpose of this infographic, a child is defined as ages 19 or under, unless otherwise specified

For detailed sources: childrenssafetynetwork.org/publications/pedestrian-safety-infographic

SOURCES

WISQARS. (2005-2010). Fatal Injury Data. WISQARS (p. Accessed July 29, 2013 by R. Willmer). Atlanta, GA. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/fatal.html

WISQARS. (2005-2010). Nonfatal Injury Data. WISQARS (p. Accessed July 29, 2013 by R. Willmer). Atlanta, GA. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/nonfatal.html

American Academy of Pediatrics. (2009). Policy statement--Pedestrian safety. Pediatrics, 124(2), 802–12. doi:10.1542/peds.2009-1143

Thompson, L. L., Rivara, F. P., Ayyagari, R. C., & Ebel, B. E. (2012). Impact of social and technological distraction on pedestrian crossing behaviour: an observational study. Injury prevention journal of the International Society for Child and Adolescent Injury Prevention. doi:10.1136/injuryprev-2012-040601