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Utah 2012 State Fact Sheet

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Unintentional injuries and violence are the leading causes of death, hospitalization, and disability for children ages 1-18. This fact sheet provides a state snapshot of data on the injury-related Maternal and Child Health Block Grant National Performance Measures and Health Status Indicators, with a special focus on disparities based on race, gender, and rural/urban residence.  The fact sheet is intended to be a helpful and easy-to-use tool for needs assessments, planning, program development, and presentations.

The Children’s Safety Network (CSN) National Injury and Violence Prevention Resource Center, funded by the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Bureau, works with states to utilize a science-based, public health approach for injury and violence prevention (IVP). CSN is available to provide information and technical assistance on injury surveillance and data; needs assessments; best practices; and the design, implementation, and evaluation of programs to prevent child and adolescent injuries.

Major Causes of Injury Death

Understanding injury rankings among other causes of death is important in determining their physical and economic role in each state. Knowing what types of injuries cause the majority of deaths and hospitalizations can inform program planning and development efforts. Table 1 shows the top 5 causes of death by age group in the state. Unintentional and intentional injury deaths are highlighted. Table 2 shows the top 5 causes of injury death by age group in the state. Intentional injury deaths are highlighted.

Table 1 Source: WISQARS Leading Causes of Death Reports, 2004-2008.

Table 2 Source: National Center for Health Statistics, Multiple Cause of Death Data, 2004-2008.

Childhood injury is also a leading cause of morbidity.  Table 3 provides information from the state's hospital discharge data on the leading causes and incidence of hospital admissions by age group.

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National Performance Measures

The Federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau Block Grant program requires State MCH programs to report on 18 National Performance Measures (NPM), two of which directly address injuries.  NPM #10 addresses the rate of deaths to children aged 14 years and younger caused by motor vehicle crashes per 100,000 children.  NPM #16 addresses the rate of suicide deaths among youths aged 15-19. 

The following figures provide information related to NPMs #10 and #16.

IVP Health Status Indicators

The Maternal and Child Health Bureau requires every state to report on 12 Health Status Indicators. Six of the indicators are related to IVP. The two figures below reflect the data reported for the IVP Health Status Indica­tors by the state in their Maternal and Child Health Block Grant Application Form 17, 2011. 

Figures 13 & 14 Source: HRSA, Title V Information System Multi-Year Report

State Specific Performance Measures and Priority Needs

Each state develops up to 7 – 10 State Performance Measures and priority needs.  The following provides information about the states’ selected 2012 injury-related performance measures and priority needs.

State Performance Measures:

Utah has the following injury-related State Performance Measure:
• To reduce the percent of youth during the last 12 months who feel so sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks or more in a row that they stopped doing usual activities.

Priority Needs:

Utah has the following injury-related priority need:
• Decrease the percent of adolescents who feel so sad or hopeless almost every day for two weeks or more in a row during the last 12 months.

State Contacts

MCH Director: Nan Streeter, nanstreeter@utah.gov
IVP Director: Trisha Keller, trishakeller@utah.gov
PRAMS Coordinator: 
Laurie Baksh, lbaksh@utah.gov
EMSC Contact:
 Whitney Levano, Wlevano@utah.gov
CDR Coordinator:
 Teresa Brechlin, tbrechlin@utah.gov

About Children’s Safety Network

The Children’s Safety Network (CSN) National Injury and Violence Prevention Resource Center, funded by the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Bureau, works with states to utilize a science-based, public health approach for injury and violence prevention (IVP). CSN is available to provide information and technical assistance on injury surveillance and data; needs assessments; best practices; and the design, implementation, and evaluation of programs to prevent child and adolescent injuries.

In this fact sheet CSN provides a cursory review of the injury morbidity and mortality data available for the state. The figures and tables in this fact sheet can help you understand the state’s progress in addressing motor vehicle traffic injuries and suicide. To target and address these and other injury issues, it is critical to understand this data. CSN can assist you in conducting detailed data analyses, utilizing surveillance systems, and undertaking needs assessments. For assistance, contact the Children's Safety Network at csninfo@edc.org.

Connect with the Children’s Safety Network
43 Foundry Avenue Waltham, MA 02453-8313

CSN’s website: http://www.ChildrensSafetyNetwork.org
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Register for the CSN newsletter: http://go.edc.org/csn-newsletter
Need TA? Have Questions? E-mail: csninfo@edc.org

CSN is funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services). A project of the Education Development Center, Inc.

January 2012