Falls

Falls

Falls

Definition: A fall is an unplanned and sudden descent to the ground, the floor, or a lower level that may result in injury.  Falls in children are often due to the presence of external hazards, such as stairs, open windows, or playground equipment, and to children’s frequent inability to accurately assess risks, curiosity and propensity for risk-taking, and lack of fully developed motor skills and coordination.

Magnitude of the Problem: Falls are the leading cause of hospitalized injury in the U.S. for children ages 0 to 14. In 2012, nearly 34,000 children ages 0 to 14 were hospitalized for unintentional falls (National Inpatient Sample, 2012, Healthcare Utilization Project, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality). According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Protect the Ones You Love campaign, falls are the leading cause of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) for children ages 0 to 4.

Prevention: Strategies to protect children from fall-related injuries include:

  • Installing safety gates on stairs and guards on windows to prevent falls by young children;
  • Providing a soft landing surface below playground equipment;
  • Using the proper safety equipment, such as knee pads, elbow pads, wrist guards, and helmets, while playing sports;
  • Supervising children near fall hazards; and
  • Removing fall hazards whenever possible.

Traumatic Brain Injury among Children and Youth: Understanding TBI and One Model State Program

Reports of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) among adults, particularly in professional sports, are often in the news. But what about TBIs among children and youth? In 2012, an estimated 329,290 children (age 19 or younger) were treated in emergency departments (EDs) for sports and recreation-related injuries that included a diagnosis of concussion or TBI. From 2001 to 2012, the rate of ED visits for sports and recreation-related injuries with a diagnosis of concussion or TBI, alone or in combination with other injuries, more than doubled among children (age 19 or younger).

CSN Webinar
Feb 21 2019

New CSN Resources on the Costs of Childhood Injuries

Release Date: 
2017-11-28 00:00:00

In 2015, injuries caused 13,363 deaths in U.S. children and adolescents aged 0-19. In addition, injuries were responsible for 200,225 hospitalizations and almost 7.7 million emergency department (ED) visits in this population (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], WISQARS, 2017). One important way to understand the burden of childhood injuries is by looking at the costs of those injuries.

The Medical Costs of Childhood Injuries: Deaths

In 2015, the total medical costs of injury-related deaths of children age 19 and younger was $153.2 million. This infographic breaks out the medical cost of child deaths by injury topic.

Download a PDF of the infographic for printing

This is part of a series on the costs of childhood injuries.

Additional infographics on the medical costs of childhood injuries:

Resource Type: 
CSN Infographic

The Medical Costs of Childhood Injuries: Hospitalizations

In 2015, the total medical costs of injury-related hospitalizations of children age 19 and younger was $6.6 billion. This infographic breaks out the medical cost of hospitalizations of children by injury topic.

Download a PDF of the infographic for printing

This is part of a series on the costs of childhood injuries.

Resource Type: 
CSN Infographic

Costs of Leading Childhood Injuries Fact Sheet

This fact sheet covers the costs of childhood injuries, including medical costs, work loss costs, and quality of life loss costs. Work loss costs include lost wages of injured persons and lost household work, or, in the case of fatality, lost earnings and household work over the victim’s expected remaining lifespan in the absence of premature death.

Resource Type: 
CSN Publications

Evidence-Based Strategies and Readings in Five Injury Topics

This publication lists evidence-based strategies and readings on child passenger safety, falls prevention, interpersonal violence prevention, suicide and self-harm prevention, and teen driver safety.

Resource Type: 
CSN Publications

Stories of Innovation: Collecting Real-Time Outcomes Data for Injury Prevention

Participants in the Child Safety Collaborative Innovation and Improvement Network (CS CoIIN) are identifying and developing innovative ways to collect real-time outcomes data. Typically, data on injury-related deaths, hospitalizations, and emergency department (ED) visits are centrally collected at the state level. On an annual basis, these data are cleaned by the state, released, and submitted to a national dataset. The cleaning and release process leads to a two-year or more delay in the availability of the data.

Resource Type: 
CSN Publications

Pages

Plugins for File Formats - need a plugin to view PDF, PPT or DOC files?. You will find corresponding links on this page.

Back to Top