FamilyIntimate Partner Violence

FamilyIntimate Partner Violence

Family/Intimate Partner Violence

Definition: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is abuse that occurs between two people in a close relationship. The term "intimate partner" includes current and former spouses and dating partners. IPV exists along a continuum from a single episode of violence to ongoing battering. The longer intimate partner abuse goes on, the more serious the effects on the victim.

Magnitude of the Problem: According to the CDC,

  • In 2007, intimate partner violence resulted in 2,340 deaths.
    • 70 percent of those who died were women, and 30% were men.
  • IPV cost the U.S. an estimated $5.8 billion in 1995 and $8.3 billion in 2003.
  • Almost 3 out of 10 women and 1 out of ten men have experienced IPV in the U.S.

Teen dating violence is a significant component of IPV. 9.8% of high school students reported that they had been purposely physically hurt by a dating partner in the past year (CDC – 2009 YRBS). A survey of adult victims of dating violence found that nearly 1 in 5 women and nearly 1 in 7 men first experienced partner violence between the ages of 11 and 17 (CDC – 2012 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey). For more information and resources, visit our Teen Dating Violence injury topic page. 

Prevention: The reduction of intimate partner violence relies upon identifying and addressing risk factors and developing programs to maintain and encourage healthy and safe relationships. To prevent teen dating violence, for example, responsible adults can mentor youth and model nonviolent dating relationships. Schools can implement policies to address potential dangers; provide training to parents, teachers, and administrators; and establish an advisory team from the community. Schools may also provide discussion groups for students and develop school safety plans.

Traumatic Brain Injury among Children and Youth: Understanding TBI and One Model State Program

Reports of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) among adults, particularly in professional sports, are often in the news. But what about TBIs among children and youth? In 2012, an estimated 329,290 children (age 19 or younger) were treated in emergency departments (EDs) for sports and recreation-related injuries that included a diagnosis of concussion or TBI. From 2001 to 2012, the rate of ED visits for sports and recreation-related injuries with a diagnosis of concussion or TBI, alone or in combination with other injuries, more than doubled among children (age 19 or younger).

CSN Webinar
Feb 21 2019

Working “Upstream” to Prevent Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

Professionals in many fields are working to address the effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), which have been shown to increase risk for a wide range of problems. One of these adverse experiences is child abuse and/or neglect, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates has been experienced by at least 1 in 7 US children in the past year. (1) If we work further “upstream,” we may prevent many traumatic events from occurring.

CSN Webinar
Sep 19 2018

Injury Disparities: Homicides

This infographic focuses on the homicide rates (per 100,000) of children, adolescents, and young adults ages 0 through 24 from 2014-2016. It breaks out these homicides by sex, race/ethnicity, and location.

Download a PDF of the infographic for printing

This is part of a series on injury disparities. Find the additional infographics here:

Resource Type: 
CSN Infographic

New CSN Resources on the Costs of Childhood Injuries

Release Date: 
2017-11-28 00:00:00

In 2015, injuries caused 13,363 deaths in U.S. children and adolescents aged 0-19. In addition, injuries were responsible for 200,225 hospitalizations and almost 7.7 million emergency department (ED) visits in this population (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], WISQARS, 2017). One important way to understand the burden of childhood injuries is by looking at the costs of those injuries.

The Medical Costs of Childhood Injuries: Deaths

In 2015, the total medical costs of injury-related deaths of children age 19 and younger was $153.2 million. This infographic breaks out the medical cost of child deaths by injury topic.

Download a PDF of the infographic for printing

This is part of a series on the costs of childhood injuries.

Additional infographics on the medical costs of childhood injuries:

Resource Type: 
CSN Infographic

The Medical Costs of Childhood Injuries: Hospitalizations

In 2015, the total medical costs of injury-related hospitalizations of children age 19 and younger was $6.6 billion. This infographic breaks out the medical cost of hospitalizations of children by injury topic.

Download a PDF of the infographic for printing

This is part of a series on the costs of childhood injuries.

Resource Type: 
CSN Infographic

Costs of Leading Childhood Injuries Fact Sheet

This fact sheet covers the costs of childhood injuries, including medical costs, work loss costs, and quality of life loss costs. Work loss costs include lost wages of injured persons and lost household work, or, in the case of fatality, lost earnings and household work over the victim’s expected remaining lifespan in the absence of premature death.

Resource Type: 
CSN Publications

Evidence-Based Strategies and Readings in Five Injury Topics

This publication lists evidence-based strategies and readings on child passenger safety, falls prevention, interpersonal violence prevention, suicide and self-harm prevention, and teen driver safety.

Resource Type: 
CSN Publications

Stories of Innovation: Collecting Real-Time Outcomes Data for Injury Prevention

Participants in the Child Safety Collaborative Innovation and Improvement Network (CS CoIIN) are identifying and developing innovative ways to collect real-time outcomes data. Typically, data on injury-related deaths, hospitalizations, and emergency department (ED) visits are centrally collected at the state level. On an annual basis, these data are cleaned by the state, released, and submitted to a national dataset. The cleaning and release process leads to a two-year or more delay in the availability of the data.

Resource Type: 
CSN Publications

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