Fire Burn Safety

Fire Burn Safety

Fire & Burn Safety

Definition: Residential fires can be caused by cooking, heating, smoking, gasoline, or candles.

Magnitude of the Problem: Lighted tobacco products (mainly cigarettes) are the leading cause of residential fire fatalities while cooking equipment is the leading cause of residential fire injuries.

According to the CDC, fires and burns are the third leading cause of unintentional injury fatalities in the U.S.

According to Safe Kids USA:

  • Approximately 366 children 14 or under died due to fire and burn injuries in 2008.
  • Nearly 90,000 children 14 or under sustained nonfatal fire or burn injuries in 2009.
  • Scalds are the most common cause of burn-related hospitalizations for young children. Contact burns are more common with older children.
  • 20% of all burn cases in the U.S. are for children ages 4 and under.
  • In 2010, children ages 5-9 had the most firework injuries. Children ages 10-14 had the second highest rate of firework injuries (per capita).

Prevention: Personal fire safety depends upon:

  • safe storage of matches, lighters, and gasoline
  • smoking outdoors and using fire safe cigarettes
  • not leaving stoves, grills, or burning candles unattended
  • performing proper maintenance on furnaces, fireplaces, chimneys, and wood stoves
  • installing smoke detectors and changing batteries annually; and
  • developing and practicing a fire evacuation plan.

Injury prevention initiatives aimed at keeping people safe from fires and burn-related injury and death include fire alarm give-aways; fire alarm safety checks; and regulations mandating fire safe cigarettes, child-resistant safety lighters, and smoke alarms in homes.

New CSN Resources on the Costs of Childhood Injuries

Release Date: 
2017-11-28 00:00:00

In 2015, injuries caused 13,363 deaths in U.S. children and adolescents aged 0-19. In addition, injuries were responsible for 200,225 hospitalizations and almost 7.7 million emergency department (ED) visits in this population (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], WISQARS, 2017). One important way to understand the burden of childhood injuries is by looking at the costs of those injuries.

The Medical Costs of Childhood Injuries: Deaths

In 2015, the total medical costs of injury-related deaths of children age 19 and younger was $153.2 million. This infographic breaks out the medical cost of child deaths by injury topic.

Download a PDF of the infographic for printing

This is part of a series on the costs of childhood injuries.

Additional infographics on the medical costs of childhood injuries:

Resource Type: 
CSN Infographic

The Medical Costs of Childhood Injuries: Hospitalizations

In 2015, the total medical costs of injury-related hospitalizations of children age 19 and younger was $6.6 billion. This infographic breaks out the medical cost of hospitalizations of children by injury topic.

Download a PDF of the infographic for printing

This is part of a series on the costs of childhood injuries.

Resource Type: 
CSN Infographic

Costs of Leading Childhood Injuries Fact Sheet

This fact sheet covers the costs of childhood injuries, including medical costs, work loss costs, and quality of life loss costs. Work loss costs include lost wages of injured persons and lost household work, or, in the case of fatality, lost earnings and household work over the victim’s expected remaining lifespan in the absence of premature death.

Resource Type: 
CSN Publications

Successful Strategies for Preventing Fire and Burn-Related Injuries among Children

Due largely to an increase in public fire education and prevention efforts, including the use of smoke alarms and sprinkler systems, fewer children die in fires today compared to 10 years ago. (1,2) Among children and youth ages 0 – 24, those ages 1 – 4 are at highest risk of fire and burn- related injury and death. (2,3) With National Fire Prevention Week coming up on October 8 – 14, 2017, this webinar provides information about strategies to further reduce fire and burn-related injuries among children.

CSN Webinar
Aug 23 2017

Fire and Burn Prevention: 2015 Resource Guide

In 2013, fires and burns were the fourth leading cause of injury-related deaths to children ages 1-18 in the U.S. (WISQARS). Most of these deaths were caused by residential fires, although a working smoke detector can reduce by half the risk of dying in a home fire (NFPA). In addition, it is important to note that scald burns—burns caused by hot liquids or steam—are especially common among young children, while older children are more likely to be burned by direct contact with flames (CDC). 

Resource Type: 
CSN Resource Guide

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