Suicide Prevention

Suicide Prevention

Suicide Prevention

Definition: Suicide is defined as death from injury, poisoning, or suffocation where there is evidence that a self-inflicted act led to the person's death. It is important to recognize the warning signs of suicide, which include talking about harming or killing oneself. Knowing the risk factors and responding appropriately to warning signs can be effective at preventing youth suicide.

Magnitude of the Problem: Suicide is the second leading cause of death for youth between the ages of 10 and 24 and results in the loss of an average of 5,183 lives each year (CDC WISQARS). According to the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey report:

  • 17.7% of students, grade 9-12, reported that they had seriously considered suicide in the previous 12 months.
  • 8.6% of students reported making at least one suicide attempt in the previous 12 months.
  • 2.8% of students reported making at least one suicide attempt in the previous 12 months that required medical attention.

Prevention: Strategies for preventing youth suicides may include:

  • enhancing protective factors,
  • reducing risk factors,
  • strengthening norms that support help-seeking behaviors,
  • implementing screening and prevention activities for high-risk groups, and
  • primary prevention of conditions such as depression, impulsive behavior, and drug or alcohol abuse.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) [online], Fatal Injury Reports, 2010-2015.   

Injury Disparities: Suicides

This infographic focuses on the suicide rates (per 100,000) of adolescents and young adults ages 10 through 24 from 2014-2016. It breaks out these deaths by sex, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, and location.

Download a PDF of the infographic for printing

This is part of a series on injury disparities. Find the additional infographics here:

Resource Type: 
CSN Infographic

Child Safety CoIIN Change Packages and Outcome Data Worksheets

The Change Packages list the evidence-based and evidence-informed strategies that will lead to breakthrough improvement in five topic areas of child safety.

The Change Packages include the Child Safety CoIIN aim statements, goals, drivers, change ideas, and measures. They were developed by the Children’s Safety Network (CSN) with input from the Steering Committee of the National Coordinated Child Safety Initiative and the states and jurisdictions that participated in Cohort 1.

Resource Type: 
CSN Publications

New CSN Resources on the Costs of Childhood Injuries

Release Date: 
2017-11-28 00:00:00

In 2015, injuries caused 13,363 deaths in U.S. children and adolescents aged 0-19. In addition, injuries were responsible for 200,225 hospitalizations and almost 7.7 million emergency department (ED) visits in this population (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], WISQARS, 2017). One important way to understand the burden of childhood injuries is by looking at the costs of those injuries.

The Medical Costs of Childhood Injuries: Deaths

In 2015, the total medical costs of injury-related deaths of children age 19 and younger was $153.2 million. This infographic breaks out the medical cost of child deaths by injury topic.

Download a PDF of the infographic for printing

This is part of a series on the costs of childhood injuries.

Additional infographics on the medical costs of childhood injuries:

Resource Type: 
CSN Infographic

The Medical Costs of Childhood Injuries: Hospitalizations

In 2015, the total medical costs of injury-related hospitalizations of children age 19 and younger was $6.6 billion. This infographic breaks out the medical cost of hospitalizations of children by injury topic.

Download a PDF of the infographic for printing

This is part of a series on the costs of childhood injuries.

Resource Type: 
CSN Infographic

Costs of Leading Childhood Injuries Fact Sheet

This fact sheet covers the costs of childhood injuries, including medical costs, work loss costs, and quality of life loss costs. Work loss costs include lost wages of injured persons and lost household work, or, in the case of fatality, lost earnings and household work over the victim’s expected remaining lifespan in the absence of premature death.

Resource Type: 
CSN Publications

Evidence-Based Strategies and Readings in Five Injury Topics

This publication lists evidence-based strategies and readings on child passenger safety, falls prevention, interpersonal violence prevention, suicide and self-harm prevention, and teen driver safety.

Resource Type: 
CSN Publications

Stories of Innovation: Collecting Real-Time Outcomes Data for Injury Prevention

Participants in the Child Safety Collaborative Innovation and Improvement Network (CS CoIIN) are identifying and developing innovative ways to collect real-time outcomes data. Typically, data on injury-related deaths, hospitalizations, and emergency department (ED) visits are centrally collected at the state level. On an annual basis, these data are cleaned by the state, released, and submitted to a national dataset. The cleaning and release process leads to a two-year or more delay in the availability of the data.

Resource Type: 
CSN Publications

Youth Suicide and Self-Harm Prevention: 2017 Resource Guide

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for U.S. children and youth ages 10 through 24, claiming an average of 5,390 lives per year (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, WISQARS Leading Cause of Death, Ages 10–24, 2011–2015). The CDC’s 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) found that 17.7 percent of high school students seriously considered attempting suicide within the past year and 8.6 percent had attempted suicide within the past year.

Resource Type: 
CSN Resource Guide

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