Traumatic Brain Injury among Children and Youth: Understanding TBI and One Model State Program

Traumatic Brain Injury among Children and Youth: Understanding TBI and One Model State Program

Image of man standing in front of brain scans
Dates: 
Thursday, February 21, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm

Reports of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) among adults, particularly in professional sports, are often in the news. But what about TBIs among children and youth? In 2012, an estimated 329,290 children (age 19 or younger) were treated in emergency departments (EDs) for sports and recreation-related injuries that included a diagnosis of concussion or TBI. From 2001 to 2012, the rate of ED visits for sports and recreation-related injuries with a diagnosis of concussion or TBI, alone or in combination with other injuries, more than doubled among children (age 19 or younger). (1) In addition to sports-related injuries, TBIs are also caused by falls, motor vehicle and traffic accidents, and assaults. Traumatic brain injuries not only affect individuals but can also have long-lasting effects on families and communities. (2)

In this webinar, Diane Sartanowicz, Director of the Massachusetts Concussion Management Coalition, described the extent of the problem of TBIs among children and youth, identified major causes of TBI, and explained the signs and symptoms of sports-related concussions as well as the clinical assessments used in diagnosing a concussion. Terrence (Terry) Love, Injury Prevention Manager for the Tennessee Department of Health, described his organization’s Safe Stars initiative, the goal of which is to provide resources and opportunities for all youth sports organizations to enhance their safety standards. Kristin Teipel, Director of the State Adolescent Health Resource Center (SAHRC) at the University of Minnesota, and a member of the Children’s Safety Now Alliance (CSN-A), moderated this webinar. 

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PDF icon PDF of the slides3.13 MB
Sources: 
  1. Trends in Sports- and Recreation-Related Traumatic Brain Injuries Treated in US Emergency Departments: The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) 2001-2012 Coronado, Victor G. MD, MPH; Haileyesus, Tadesse MS; Cheng, Tabitha A. MD; Bell, Jeneita M. MD, MPH; Haarbauer-Krupa, Juliet PhD; Lionbarger, Michael R. MPH; Flores-Herrera, Javier MD, MPH; McGuire, Lisa C. PhD; Gilchrist, Julie MD. PhD.Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation: May/June 2015 - Volume 30 - Issue 3 - p 185–197
  2. TBI Get the Facts: https://www.cdc.gov/traumaticbraininjury/get_the_facts.html
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