Skip to main content

Teen Driving Safety

share

Disparities in Safety Belt Use by Sexual Orientation Identity Among US High School Students | American Journal of Public Health

Jan 09, 2014

Objectives: We examined associations between adolescents’ safety belt use and sexual orientation identity.

Teen Drivers Become Distracted Quickly | Healthfinder.gov

Jan 09, 2014

Teen drivers quickly move from focused to distracted while behind the wheel, and this raises their risk for accidents, a new study finds.

Car crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2010, more than 2,500 teens died in car crashes -- seven deaths every day -- and teen drivers are three times more likely than drivers aged 20 and older to be in fatal crashes.

Distracted-Driving Deaths of Pedestrians, Cyclists Up in U.S., Study Finds | Healthfinder.gov

Dec 12, 2013

American pedestrians and bicyclists are being killed by distracted drivers in increasing numbers, a new study finds.

Pedestrian deaths caused by distracted driving -- perhaps talking on cell phones, using a GPS or eating at the wheel -- jumped nearly 50 percent in a recent five-year period, reaching 500 in 2010.

New Resource Alert: Teen Drive Safety Toolset from The Center for Injury Research and Prevention

Nov 14, 2013

In conjunction with Temple University’s Department of Public Health, the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research (APTR) recently released a set of Public Health Learning Modules aimed at advancing public knowledge of policy initiatives, existing and emerging research, and transformative models. Allison E.

Views of New Jersey Teenagers about Their State's Policies for Beginning Drivers | Journal of Safety Research

image of state

Three New Jersey licensing policies are unique in the United States: (a) minimum licensing age of 17; (b) applying full graduated driver licensing (GDL) rules to beginners younger than 21; and (c) requiring license status decals on vehicle plates of drivers in GDL. 

Three New Jersey licensing policies are unique in the United States: (a) minimum licensing age of 17; (b) applying full graduated driver licensing (GDL) rules to beginners younger than 21; and (c) requiring license status decals on vehicle plates of drivers in GDL.  New Jersey 17–19 year-olds were surveyed by telephone and online.  Eighty-four percent approved licensing at 17; 77% approved applying GDL to older novices; 23% approved the decal policy.

In Massachusetts, Fewer Teen Accidents and Drivers | Boston Globe

image of state

The number of accidents involving newly licensed teenagers has dropped by half since Massachusetts raised the training requirements for young drivers and boosted penalties for teens who speed or commit other infractions.

The number of accidents involving newly licensed teenagers has dropped by half since Massachusetts raised the training requirements for young drivers and boosted penalties for teens who speed or commit other infractions.

That good news gives transportation officials ample reason to crow about the law’s impact. But state data reviewed by the Globe suggest the biggest reason for the drop in crashes may come as a surprise: It is that fewer teens are on the road — not just that teens are driving more carefully.

How Much Does Your State Fine For Texting and Driving? | Mother Jones

Oct 31, 2013

The good news: fatal car crashes are on the decline.

NHTSA Unveils '5 to Drive' Teen Safety Campaign to Reduce High Death Rate of Teens

Oct 24, 2013

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) today unveiled a new campaign that challenges parents to discuss five critical driving practices with their teenage drivers that can have the greatest beneficial impacts in the event of a crash. The new "5 to Drive" campaign is being launched to coincide with National Teen Driver Safety Week, October 20-26, 2013.

Distracted Driving and Motor Vehicle Crashes Among Teens | JAMA Pediatrics

Oct 17, 2013

Motor vehicle crashes are one of the most common causes of death for adolescents in the United States. Adolescents are 4 times more likely to be involved in a motor vehicle crash compared with drivers older than 20 years. A major risk factor for motor vehicle crashes is distracted driving.

Distracted driving includes the following:

1.     Any behavior that takes the driver’s eyes off the road (visual distraction).

Syndicate content